Recruiters can do better

I read a piece titled “Table Manners” by Christopher Demers and it evoked those unpleasant manners and practices of recruiters. If it is not ‘laziness’ I do not know what word to describe a recruiter who mentions nothing about his client when putting up a job ad. If you wont reveal the identity of the organisation you are filling a position for (even though I frown at this), what about the industry or its market position. I think the focus of every recruiter is to attract a wide pool of talent for position being advertised!

Sometimes when I see ambiguities between job descriptions (JD) and person specifications I wonder if the recruiter had read through the ad before putting it up. The truth could be that these recruiters ‘copy and paste’ already prepared  JD of a particular role for all organisations. In the process, vital details are left out.

The use of social media for recruitment has been on the rise and now a popular source of hiring for most recruiters. How well have they fared on this platform can be determined by the quality of job ads on Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook etc. I do understand the constraints of word counts with some of these applications which made it practically difficult to spell out every detail as regards a particular job role. However, I think they can get round this constraint by converting the ad to a web link which can be opened in a new window.

A worrying trend also emerging is for recruiters to tersely post a job role and request for interested candidates to give their email addresses in the comment section. This is a ‘NO’ for me. I wont give out my email address to the public domain with hackers and spammers everywhere. I’m sure other people will share this sentiment. It also gives room for people to send you unsolicited emails and requests. Recruiters can definitely do better than this!

Lack of feedback is an issue so many people have harped on but has lingered in the recruitment industry. The common excuse is giving feedback to hordes of unsuccessful candidates is not practicable. I beg to differ, it is. I wont go into the details of stating the importance of giving feedback as this has been done in numerous blogs but it is important to stress that feedback is possible no matter the number of candidates you have.

As 2015 beckons, we expect to see recruiters up the ante in the new year.

 

Race against Time in the Job Market

The route leading to the labour market is one which we have all taken and is well familiar to most of us. Our experiences may vary but a common theme which describes the job market is its unsavoury nature.

Depending on which side of the market you are, blames are heaped on the other party. Recruiters are always on the receiving and get a lot of bashing from job seekers on one hand while job seekers are seen as not having the right skills and attitude for available jobs from the recruiters’ perspective.

As the blame game goes back and forth, I discovered a unique factor working for or against the two parties. The factor of time is an essential element of the recruiting process which works for or against the recruiter and the job seeker.

Getting a vacant position filled within a given period is vital to any recruiter while job seekers also compete against time to get their applications out in record time. How the two parties react to the time factor may vary but it has a consequential effect on the outcome. Some job seekers do not wait to understand the role being advertised before sending their applications. Employers or recruiters are often overwhelmed by the number of CVs they receive for advertised positions that they sometime come up with wrong fits.

The two key players in recruitment market have devised different means to beat the constraint of time. Job seekers now have ‘customised’ CVs for numerous job roles. This allows them to apply for more than one job at at given time and more importantly beating the deadline. Recruiters on the other hand, are embracing technology to help in filtering through CVs for qualified candidates. It is also a common practice for recruiters to contact only qualified candidates for the next stage of the process. This is all in a bid to save time.

It is however contestable if these time-saving methods have helped the entire recruitment process. Customised CVs might not indicate specific skills required for some particular roles and could hinder candidate’s chances of proceeding to the next stage. Some job applications are quite extensive and require patience and time to get by them; using a customised CV for such applications could jeorpadise the chances of candidates.

Recruiters and employers are not only in the job market to just recruit anybody but to be able to attract a pool of skilled and qualified hands to select from. This can be achieved if job seekers are treated with respect and dignity. Giving critical feedback to all candidates, whether successful or not, makes employers become ’employers of choice’.

Whichever way one looks at it, time is a tricky element in the job market. Consequently, it is important for all players to strike a balance in the race against time. How they achieve this depends on the industry, immediacy or futuristic role, and other important details of the recruitment industry.

Bashir Mudi Baba can be reached on Twitter @El_De_Bash